thumbnail

The ongoing Puʻu ʻŌʻō eruption of Kīlauea Volcano, Hawaiʻi: 30 years of eruptive activity

Fact Sheet 2012-3127

U.S. Geological Survey and the National Park Service - Our Volcanic Public Lands
By:
, ,

Links

Abstract

The Puʻu ʻŌʻō eruption of Kīlauea Volcano is its longest rift-zone eruption in more than 500 years. Since the eruption began in 1983, lava flows have buried 48 square miles (125 square kilometers) of land and added about 500 acres (200 hectares) of new land to the Island of Hawaiʻi. The eruption not only challenges local communities, which must adapt to an ever-changing and sometimes-destructive environment, but has also drawn millions of visitors to Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park. U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists closely monitor and evaluate hazards at Hawaiʻi’s volcanoes and also work with park rangers to help ensure safe lava viewing for visitors.

Geospatial Extents

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Report
Publication Subtype:
USGS Numbered Series
Title:
The ongoing Puʻu ʻŌʻō eruption of Kīlauea Volcano, Hawaiʻi: 30 years of eruptive activity
Series title:
Fact Sheet
Series number:
2012-3127
Year Published:
2013
Language:
English
Publisher:
U.S. Geological Survey
Publisher location:
Reston, VA
Contributing office(s):
Volcano Science Center
Description:
6 p.
Time Range Start:
1983-01-01T12:00:00
Country:
United States
State:
Hawai'i
Other Geospatial:
Kilauea Volcano
Additional Online Files(Y/N):
N