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Nearshore temperature findings for the Colorado River in Grand Canyon, Arizona: possible implications for native fish

Fact Sheet 2013-3104

By:
and
DOI: 10.3133/fs20133104

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Abstract

Since the completion of Glen Canyon Dam, Arizona, in 1963, downstream water temperatures in the main channel of the Colorado River in Glen, Marble, and Grand Canyons are much colder in summer. This has negatively affected humpback chub (Gila cypha) and other native fish adapted to seasonally warm water, reducing main-channel spawning activity and impeding the growth and development of larval and juvenile fish. Recently published studies by U.S. Geological Survey scientists found that under certain conditions some isolated nearshore environments in Grand Canyon allow water to become separated from the main-channel current and to warm, providing refuge areas for the development of larval and juvenile fish.

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Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Report
Publication Subtype:
USGS Numbered Series
Title:
Nearshore temperature findings for the Colorado River in Grand Canyon, Arizona: possible implications for native fish
Series title:
Fact Sheet
Series number:
2013-3104
DOI:
10.3133/fs20133104
Year Published:
2013
Language:
English
Publisher:
U.S. Geological Survey
Publisher location:
Reston, VA
Contributing office(s):
Southwest Biological Science Center
Description:
4 p.
Country:
United States
State:
Arizona
Other Geospatial:
Colorado River;Glen Canyon Dam;Grand Canyon