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Geologic structure, hydrology, and water quality of the Laramie-Fox Hills aquifer in the Denver Basin, Colorado

Hydrologic Atlas 650

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Abstract

The Laramie-Fox Hills aquifer underlies an area of about 6,700 square miles in east-central Colorado and is an important water supply for many residents in the area. Population increases have produced increasing demands for ground water and have led to significant water-level declines in parts of the aquifer. Results of this study, which was undertaken to better define the water-supply potential of the aquifer, indicate that the aquifer consists of interbedded sandstone, siltstone and shale at depths of as much as 3,200 feet. The water-yielding sandstone and siltstone beds have a total thickness of more than 200 feet in some areas. The 1978 potentiometric-surface map indicates that ground water moves from the south-central part of the aquifer toward the margins of the aquifer where most of the water discharges to streams and alluvial aquifers. Some groundwater recharge occurs as downward movement of water from the overlying Arapahoe aquifer. Water-level declines between 1958 and 1978 exceeded 200 feet in an 80-square-mile area near Brighton, while in other parts of the aquifer only moderate changes have occurred. Water in the aquifer is generally of a sodium bicarbonate type with dissolved-solids concentrations commonly ranging from 400 to 1,200 milligrams per liter. (USGS)

Geospatial Extents

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Report
Publication Subtype:
USGS Numbered Series
Title:
Geologic structure, hydrology, and water quality of the Laramie-Fox Hills aquifer in the Denver Basin, Colorado
Series title:
Hydrologic Atlas
Series number:
650
Edition:
-
Year Published:
1981
Language:
ENGLISH
Description:
10 maps :col. ;41 x 27 cm. on 3 sheets 113 x 89 cm. or smaller.
Scale:
500000