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GPS-aided inertial technology and navigation-based photogrammetry for aerial mapping the San Andreas fault system

Open-File Report 2004-1389

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Abstract

Aerial mapping of the San Andreas Fault System can be realized more efficiently and rapidly without ground control and conventional aerotriangulation. This is achieved by the direct geopositioning of the exterior orientation of a digital imaging sensor by use of an integrated Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver and an Inertial Navigation System (INS). A crucial issue to this particular type of aerial mapping is the accuracy, scale, consistency, and speed achievable by such a system. To address these questions, an Applanix Digital Sensor System (DSS) was used to examine its potential for near real-time mapping. Large segments of vegetation along the San Andreas and Cucamonga faults near the foothills of the San Bernardino and San Gabriel Mountains were burned to the ground in the California wildfires of October-November 2003. A 175 km corridor through what once was a thickly vegetated and hidden fault surface was chosen for this study. Both faults pose a major hazard to the greater Los Angeles metropolitan area and a near real-time mapping system could provide information vital to a post-disaster response.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Report
Publication Subtype:
USGS Numbered Series
Title:
GPS-aided inertial technology and navigation-based photogrammetry for aerial mapping the San Andreas fault system
Series title:
Open-File Report
Series number:
2004-1389
Edition:
-
Year Published:
2004
Language:
ENGLISH
Description:
12 p.
Scale:
500000