thumbnail

User's Guide, software for reduction and analysis of daily weather and surface-water data: Tools for time series analysis of precipitation, temperature, and streamflow data

Open-File Report 2006-1101

By:

Links

Abstract

The software described here is used to process and analyze daily weather and surface-water data. The programs are refinements of earlier versions that include minor corrections and routines to calculate frequencies above a threshold on an annual or seasonal basis. Earlier versions of this software were used successfully to analyze historical precipitation patterns of the Mojave Desert and the southern Colorado Plateau regions, ecosystem response to climate variation, and variation of sediment-runoff frequency related to climate (Hereford and others, 2003; 2004; in press; Griffiths and others, 2006). The main program described here (Day_Cli_Ann_v5.3) uses daily data to develop a time series of various statistics for a user specified accounting period such as a year or season. The statistics include averages and totals, but the emphasis is on the frequency of occurrence in days of relatively rare weather or runoff events. These statistics are indices of climate variation; for a discussion of climate indices, see the Climate Research Unit website of the University of East Anglia (http://www.cru.uea.ac.uk/projects/stardex/) and the Climate Change Indices web site (http://cccma.seos.uvic.ca/ETCCDMI/indices.html). Specifically, the indices computed with this software are the frequency of high intensity 24-hour rainfall, unusually warm temperature, and unusually high runoff. These rare, or extreme events, are those greater than the 90th percentile of precipitation, streamflow, or temperature computed for the period of record of weather or gaging stations. If they cluster in time over several decades, extreme events may produce detectable change in the physical landscape and ecosystem of a given region. Although the software has been tested on a variety of data, as with any software, the user should carefully evaluate the results with their data. The programs were designed for the range of precipitation, temperature, and streamflow measurements expected in the semiarid Southwest United States. The user is encouraged to review the examples provided with the software. The software is written in Fortran 90 with Fortran 95 extensions and was compiled with the Digital Visual Fortran compiler version 6.6. The executables run on Windows 2000 and XP, and they operate in a MS-DOS console window that has only very simple graphical options such as font size and color, background color, and size of the window. Error trapping was not written into the programs. Typically, when an error occurs, the console window closes without a message.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Report
Publication Subtype:
USGS Numbered Series
Title:
User's Guide, software for reduction and analysis of daily weather and surface-water data: Tools for time series analysis of precipitation, temperature, and streamflow data
Series title:
Open-File Report
Series number:
2006-1101
Edition:
Version 1.0
Year Published:
2006
Language:
ENGLISH
Contributing office(s):
Western Earth Surface Processes
Description:
iii, 11 p.
Online Only (Y/N):
Y
Additional Online Files(Y/N):
Y