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Craddock Massif and Vinson Massif remeasured

Open-File Report 2007-1047-SRP-069

By:
and
DOI: 10.3133/ofr20071047SRP069

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Abstract

The highest peak in Antarctica, the Vinson Massif (78º35’S, 85º25’W), is at an elevation of 4892 m (16,046 ft), as determined in 2004. Measurements of the elevation have fluctuated over the years, from its earliest surveyed elevation of 5140 m (16,859 ft), to its present height. Vinson Massif and three of its near neighbors in the Sentinel Range of the Ellsworth Mountains are the highest peaks in Antarctica, making them a favorite objective of mountaineers. Well over 1,100 people have climbed Vinson since the first ascent by a team in the 1966-67 austral summer. The range is composed of Crashsite quartzite, making the Sentinel’s very resistant to erosion. Very accurate elevations have been achieved annually by GPS mapping done by a climbing team sponsored by the Omega Foundation, active in Antarctica since 1998. The Craddock Massif now includes Mt. Craddock, the ninth highest peak in Antarctica, at 4368 m (14,327 ft). Both are named for Campbell Craddock*, a U.S. geologist active in Antarctic research beginning in 1959-60.

Geospatial Extents

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Report
Publication Subtype:
USGS Numbered Series
Title:
Craddock Massif and Vinson Massif remeasured
Series title:
Open-File Report
Series number:
2007-1047-SRP-069
DOI:
10.3133/ofr20071047SRP069
Year Published:
2007
Language:
English
Publisher:
U.S. Geological Survey
Publisher location:
Reston, VA
Description:
3 p.
Larger Work Type:
Report
Larger Work Subtype:
USGS Numbered Series
Larger Work Title:
Antarctica: A Keystone in a Changing World--Online Proceedings for the Tenth International Symposium on Antarctic Earth Sciences. Santa Barbara, California, U.S.A.--August 26 to September 1, 2007
Other Geospatial:
Antarctica;Craddock Massif;Vinson Massif
Additional Online Files(Y/N):
N