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Vulnerability of National Park Service beaches to inundation during a direct hurricane landfall: Fire Island National Seashore

Open-File Report 2007-1389

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Abstract

Waves and storm surge associated with strong tropical storms are part of the natural process of barrier-island evolution and can cause extensive morphologic changes in coastal parks, leading to reduced visitor accessibility and enjoyment. Even at Fire Island National Seashore, a barrier-island coastal park in New York where extratropical storms (northeasters) dominate storm activity, the beaches are vulnerable to the powerful, sand-moving forces of hurricanes. The vulnerability of park beaches to inundation, and associated extreme coastal change, during a direct hurricane landfall can be assessed by comparing the elevations of storm-induced mean-water levels (storm surge) to the elevations of the crest of the sand dune that defines the beach system. Maps detailing the inundation potential for Category 1-4 hurricanes can be used by park managers to determine the relative vulnerability of various barrier-island parks and to assess which areas of a particular park are more susceptible to inundation and extreme coastal changes.

Geospatial Extents

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Report
Publication Subtype:
USGS Numbered Series
Title:
Vulnerability of National Park Service beaches to inundation during a direct hurricane landfall: Fire Island National Seashore
Series title:
Open-File Report
Series number:
2007-1389
Year Published:
2007
Language:
English
Publisher:
U.S. Geological Survey
Publisher location:
Reston, VA
Contributing office(s):
Florida Integrated Science Center - St. Petersburg
Description:
8 p.
Country:
United States
State:
New York
Other Geospatial:
Fire Island National Seashore
Online Only (Y/N):
Y