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Biogeochemical processes in an urban, restored wetland of San Francisco Bay, California, 2007-2009; methods and data for plant, sediment and water parameters

Open-File Report 2010-1299

In Cooperation with the National Park Service Water Quality Program
By:
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Abstract

The restoration of 18 acres of historic tidal marsh at Crissy Field has had great success in terms of public outreach and visibility, but less success in terms of revegetated marsh sustainability. Native cordgrass (Spartina foliosa) has experienced dieback and has failed to recolonize following extended flooding events during unintended periodic closures of its inlet channel, which inhibits daily tidal flushing. We examined the biogeochemical impacts of these impoundment events on plant physiology and on sulfur and mercury chemistry to help the National Park Service land managers determine the relative influence of these inlet closures on marsh function. In this comparative study, we examined key pools of sulfur, mercury, and carbon compounds both during and between closure events. Further, we estimated the net hydrodynamic flux of methylmercury and total mercury to and from the marsh during a 24-hour diurnal cycle. This report documents the methods used and the data generated during the study.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Report
Publication Subtype:
USGS Numbered Series
Title:
Biogeochemical processes in an urban, restored wetland of San Francisco Bay, California, 2007-2009; methods and data for plant, sediment and water parameters
Series title:
Open-File Report
Series number:
2010-1299
Edition:
-
Year Published:
2010
Language:
ENGLISH
Publisher:
U.S. Geological Survey
Contributing office(s):
National Research Program
Description:
vi, 21 p.; Appendix; Download of Appendix A
Time Range Start:
2007-01-01T12:00:00
Time Range End:
2009-12-31T12:00:00
Online Only (Y/N):
Y
Additional Online Files(Y/N):
Y