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Ground-water hydrology of James City County, Virginia

Open-File Report 80-961

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Abstract

Urbanization and increase in water demand prompted a 2-year study of groundwater availability and quality in the county of James City. The coastal-plain sediments, parts of which underlie the county, are the largest source of groundwater in Virginia. Four aquifers form the complex aquifer system. Hydraulic characteristics vary from aquifer to aquifer and from place to place. The Cretaceous aquifer furnishes nearly all the water for industrial and municipal needs. Movement of water in the Cretaceous aquifer is toward cones of depression formed by pumping centers at Williamsburg and Dow Badische Co. All aquifers contain water that generally meets State standards for drinking water. Water in the Cretaceous aquifer is of the sodium chloride bicarbonate type. As depth of aquifer increases, the concentrations of dissolved solids and chloride also increase. Saline water (more than 250 milligrams per liter) occupies the deeper parts of the confined aquifers. The amount of water stored in the coastal sediments is estimated to be 650-1300 billion gallons. An increase in pumpage to accomodate the expected daily demand of 9.8 million gallons per day in year 2000 is feasible provided pumpage is distributed over the county. (USGS)

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Report
Publication Subtype:
USGS Numbered Series
Title:
Ground-water hydrology of James City County, Virginia
Series title:
Open-File Report
Series number:
80-961
Edition:
-
Year Published:
1980
Language:
ENGLISH
Publisher:
U.S. Geological Survey,
Description:
ix, 82 p. ill., maps ;28 cm.