thumbnail

Evapotranspiration from forage grass replacing native vegetation in the Gila River valley of Arizona

Open-File Report 81-1018

By:

Links

Abstract

Estimates of evapotranspiration from an area of forage grass, which had been planted to replace native vegetation of little economic value, were made daily for a 363-day period in 1969 and 1970. The measurement site was located in the Gila River valley in east-central Arizona. The forage, panigrass (Panicum antidotale Retz.), grew from seed during the early summer of 1969 and after winterkill, regrew in 1970. Daily evapotranspiration estimates, which were based on energy budget measurements, ranged from a maximum of 9.2 millimeters to small amounts of condensation. Two daily values of substantial condensation (0.9 and 0.4 millimeter) were of dubious quality, but were retained in the record. The annual evapotranspiration was 989 millimeters, of which about 332 millimeters came from precipitation at the site. The water table fluctuated between 210 and 280 centimeters below land surface. However, the measurement site was near a wash, so that undocumented, shallower subterranean flows may have occurred. (USGS)

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Report
Publication Subtype:
USGS Numbered Series
Title:
Evapotranspiration from forage grass replacing native vegetation in the Gila River valley of Arizona
Series title:
Open-File Report
Series number:
81-1018
Edition:
-
Year Published:
1981
Language:
ENGLISH
Publisher:
U.S Geological Survey,
Description:
v, 43 p. ill., map ;28 cm.