thumbnail

Sediment and channel-geometry investigations for the Kansas River bank stabilization study, Kansas, Nebraska, and Colorado

Open-File Report 81-128

By:
, , and

Links

Abstract

Analysis of hydrologic data from the Kansas River basin suggests that the channels of the lower Solomon, Saline, and Smoky Hill Rivers have narrowed and stabilized as a result of construction of upstream reservoirs. The Kansas River channel, however, remains relatively unstable and locally active. Streamflow regulation and sediment trapping by reservoirs are possible causes of changes occurring at various Kansas River sites. An inferred deficiency of the suspended-sediment load, however, is likely to cause continuing instability. Suspended sediment in the Kansas River apparently is too sparse to form and maintain stable alluvial banks. The deficiency probably results in an increase of bed material movement, general channel widening, and local braiding. Significant channel degradation is lacking at most sites, but may occur in response to long-term (decades-to-centuries) regulation. Recent degradation near Bonner Springs, Kans., may be the result of sand and gravel removal. Any imposed changes that shorten the channel or reduce the suspended-sediment discharge of the Kansas River are expected to cause additional channel instability. (USGS)

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Report
Publication Subtype:
USGS Numbered Series
Title:
Sediment and channel-geometry investigations for the Kansas River bank stabilization study, Kansas, Nebraska, and Colorado
Series title:
Open-File Report
Series number:
81-128
Edition:
-
Year Published:
1982
Language:
ENGLISH
Publisher:
U.S. Geological Survey,
Description:
71 p. :ill., maps ;28 cm.