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Geohydrology and effects of water use in the Black Mesa area, Navajo and Hopi Indian Reservations, Arizona

Open-File Report 81-911

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Abstract

The main source of water in the 5,400-square-mile Black Mesa area is the N aquifer, which consists of the Navajo Sandstone and underlying Kayenta Formation and Wingate Sandstone. Water is under confined conditions in the central 3,300 square miles. Transmissivity is less than 1,000 feet squared per day. Storage coefficient is less than 0.0004 in the confined part of the aquifer and at least 0.1 in the unconfined part. Recharge is about 13,000 acre-feet per year, and storage at equilibrium, which was before 1965, was at least 180 million acre-feet. Ground-water withdrawals were less than 400 acre-feet per year before 1970 and increased to 5,300 acre-feet per year 1976-1979. By 1980, municipal-supply pumpage is expected to exceed that for a coal-slurry pipeline. Water levels have declined throughout the confined part of the aquifer. Decline of more than 100 feet was calculated for an area of 200 square miles through 1979 and was projected for 440 square miles through 2001. In the unconfined part, project declines averaged less than 1 foot. If pumping for coal slurry stopped, most of the decline would recover within 10 years. (USGS)

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Report
Publication Subtype:
USGS Numbered Series
Title:
Geohydrology and effects of water use in the Black Mesa area, Navajo and Hopi Indian Reservations, Arizona
Series title:
Open-File Report
Series number:
81-911
Edition:
-
Year Published:
1981
Language:
ENGLISH
Publisher:
U.S. Geological Survey,
Description:
viii, 55 p. ill., map ;28 cm.