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Availability and quality of water from the Dakota aquifer, northwest Iowa

Open-File Report 82-264

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Abstract

The Dakota aquifer in northwest Iowa consists of sandstones in the Dakota Formation. Sandstone beds are from less than 10 to more than 150 feet thick and cumulatively total more than 200 feet throughout much of the area. The aquifer is confined by shale, carbonate rocks, till and loess. Water flows from the north-central part of the area to the south and southwest. Recharge is through leakage from above. Discharge is to underlying aquifers and alluvium along the Missouri and Big Sioux Rivers. An average hydraulic conductivity of 300 gallons per day per foot squared was used to estimate potential yield to wells. Yields of more than 350 gallons per minute can be commonly expected and more than 1000 gallons per minute can be produced in some areas. The quality of water from the Dakota is a calcium-magnesium-sulfate type which is generally suitable for irrigation. Water quality may be locally altered by leakage from the underlying Paleozoic aquifers if withdrawals reverse the natural flow from the Dakota into the Paleozoic. Such a reversal may exist around the City of LeMars. The presence of radionuclides exceeds recommended limits at several sites. (USGS)

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Report
Publication Subtype:
USGS Numbered Series
Title:
Availability and quality of water from the Dakota aquifer, northwest Iowa
Series title:
Open-File Report
Series number:
82-264
Edition:
-
Year Published:
1982
Language:
ENGLISH
Publisher:
U.S. Geological Survey,
Description:
83 leaves :ill., map ;28 cm.