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Land use, water use, streamflow, and water-quality characteristics of the Charlotte Harbor inflow area, Florida

Open-File Report 87-472

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Abstract

Charlotte Harbor, a 270-sq-mi estuarine system in west-central Florida, is being subjected to increasing environmental stress by rapid population growth and development. Population in the inflow area may double by 2020, resulting in increased demands for freshwater and increased waste loads. The Myakka, Peace, and Caloosahatchee Rivers are the three major rivers emptying into the harbor. A long-term trend analysis of streamflow data shows a statistically significant decreasing trend for the Peace River stations at Bartow, Zolfo Springs, and Arcadia. There is no significant trend in the Myakka or Caloosahatchee River data. In the Peace River, the decrease in flow may be related to a long-term decline in the potentiometric surface of the underlying Floridan aquifer system. By the year 2020, the increased population will require an additional 75 million gal/day for water supply. An additional 60 million gal/day of wastewater and urban runoff alone will increase by more than 3 tons/day, which is about three times the current (1986) total nitrogen load from the Myakka River. (USGS)

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Report
Publication Subtype:
USGS Numbered Series
Title:
Land use, water use, streamflow, and water-quality characteristics of the Charlotte Harbor inflow area, Florida
Series title:
Open-File Report
Series number:
87-472
Edition:
-
Year Published:
1987
Language:
ENGLISH
Publisher:
U.S. Geological Survey,
Description:
104 p. :ill., maps ;28 cm.