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Pesticide movement in soils; a comparison of no-tillage and conventional tillage in the Beaver Creek watershed in West Tennessee

Open-File Report 95-329

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Abstract

In 1993, a study of pesticide movement and degradation in soils was intitated in the Beaver Creek watershed, which consists of about 95,000 acres and includes some of the Nation's most highly erodible soils. Resource-management agencies in this locality have recommended conservation tillage or "no-tillage" as a best management practices to control soil erosion. The pesticide aldicarb was selected for this study because it is both highly mobile and extremely toxic. Horizontal movement of aldicarb and its metabolites was negligible. Vertical movement of aldicarb and its metabolites was limited to the top 2.5 feet of soil. Most of the aldicarb residue (over 85 percent) remaining in the soil after 148 days was detected in the top 0.5 foot of soil. No significant differences in the movement or degradation of aldicarb and its metabolites were observed between the no-tilled and conventionally tilled fields. No-till practices did not increase the downward movement of aldicarb in the test areas. No-tillage has proven to be an effective best management practice for soil-loss reduction in many studies throughout the United States.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Report
Publication Subtype:
USGS Numbered Series
Title:
Pesticide movement in soils; a comparison of no-tillage and conventional tillage in the Beaver Creek watershed in West Tennessee
Series title:
Open-File Report
Series number:
95-329
Edition:
-
Year Published:
1995
Language:
ENGLISH
Publisher:
U.S. Geological Survey ; U.S.G.S. Earth Science Information Center, Open-File Reports Section [distributor],
Description:
1 folded sheet :ill. ;22 x 36 cm. folded to 22 x 9 cm.