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Geologic map showing springs rich in carbon dioxide or or chloride in California

Water Resources Investigations Open-File Map 1975

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Abstract

Carbon dioxide- and chloride-rich springs occur in all geologic provinces in California, but are most abundant in the Coast Ranges and the Great Valley. The carbon-dioxide-rich springs issue mainly from Franciscan terrane; they also are rich in boron and are of the metamorphic type (White, 1957). Based on isotopic data, either the carbon dioxide or the water, or both, may be of metamorphic origin. Because of high magnesium values, the water of many of the carbon-dioxide-rich springs is thought to have passed through serpentinite. The chloride-rich waters are most common in rocks of the Great Valley sequence. Nearly all are more dilute than present-day sea water. The similarity in isotopic compositions of the metamorphic carbon-dioxide-rich water and the chloride-rich water may indicate a similar extent of water-rock interaction.

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Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Report
Publication Subtype:
USGS Unnumbered Series
Title:
Geologic map showing springs rich in carbon dioxide or or chloride in California
Series title:
Water Resources Investigations Open-File Map
Series number:
1975
Year Published:
1975
Language:
English
Publisher:
Government Printing Office
Publisher location:
Washington, D.C.
Description:
1 p.: map; 1 Plate: col., 29 x 33 cm.
Country:
United States
County:
California
Scale:
500000