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Recent vegetation changes along the Colorado River between Glen Canyon Dam and Lake Mead, Arizona

Professional Paper 1132

By:
,

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Abstract

Vegetation changes in the canyon of the Colorado River between Glen Canyon Dam and Lake Mead were studied by comparing photographs taken prior to completion of Glen Canyon Dam in 1963 with photographs taken afterwards at the same sites. In general, the older pictures show an absence of riparian plants along the banks of the river. The newer photographs of each pair were taken in 1972 through 1976 and reveal an increased density of many plant species. Exotic species, such as saltcedar and camel-thorn, and native riparian plants such as sandbar willow, arrowweed, desert broom and cattail, now form a new riparian community along much of the channel of the Colorado River between Glen Canyon Dam and Lake Mead. The matched photographs also reveal that changes have occurred in the amount of sand and silt deposited along the banks. Detailed maps are presented showing distribution of 25 plant species along the reach of the Colorado River studied. Data showing changes in the hydrologic regime since completion of Glen Canyon Dam are presented. (Kosco-USGS)

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Report
Publication Subtype:
USGS Numbered Series
Title:
Recent vegetation changes along the Colorado River between Glen Canyon Dam and Lake Mead, Arizona
Series title:
Professional Paper
Series number:
1132
Edition:
-
Year Published:
1980
Language:
ENGLISH
Publisher:
U.S. Govt. Print. Off.,
Description:
125 p.; plates in pocket