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Summary of suspended-sediment data for streams draining the Chesapeake Bay Watershed, water years 1952-2002

Scientific Investigations Report 2004-5056

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Abstract

U.S. Geological Survey suspended-sediment data from 1952 to 2002 from selected stream-gaging stations draining the nontidal parts of the Chesapeake Bay Watershed were summarized to identify areas in the Watershed with high suspended-sediment loads, yields, and concentrations. The suspended-sediment load data were separated into two periods, 1952?1984 and 1985?2001. In 1985, the Chesapeake Bay Program began recommending sediment regulations, so 1985 represents an important break in the data. The instantaneous suspended-sediment concentration data were examined for the period 1985?2002. Suspended-sediment load data collected from 43 stations from 1952?1984, with a minimum of 3 years of record, indicated that the two highest average annual suspended-sediment loads were for stations on the main stem of the Potomac and Susquehanna Rivers. The highest average annual sediment yields and discharge-weighted sediment concentrations were for streams draining the metropolitan Washington, D.C. area, possibly related to urbanization. Data from 1985 through 2001 that were collected from 35 stations with a minimum of 3 years of record showed that the highest average annual suspended-sediment loads were also on the main stem of the Potomac and Susquehanna Rivers. Four of the six highest average annual sediment yields and discharge-weighted sediment concentrations for 1985?2001 were for stations draining to the Conestoga River, a tributary of the Susquehanna River. Examination of percentiles (10th, 50th, and 90th) of instantaneous suspended-sediment concentrations for 51 stations with a minimum of 3 years of data and at least 10 samples in a year indicated that streams that drain to the Conestoga River had the highest suspended-sediment concentrations. Sediment-transport curves for the 51 stations were separated into classes by drainage-area size. Five of the eight drainage-area classes showed that streams draining the Susquehanna River Basin had the highest suspended-sediment concentrations. Three of the Susquehanna River Basin drainage-area classes were in the Conestoga River Basin. Agriculture is the dominant land use in the Conestoga River Basin and may be an important source of sediment leading to the high sediment yields and instantaneous suspended-sediment concentrations, but further research is needed to quantify the importance of agriculture in relation to other sources of sediment in the Conestoga River Basin.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Report
Publication Subtype:
USGS Numbered Series
Title:
Summary of suspended-sediment data for streams draining the Chesapeake Bay Watershed, water years 1952-2002
Series title:
Scientific Investigations Report
Series number:
2004-5056
Edition:
-
Year Published:
2004
Language:
ENGLISH
Description:
vi, 59 p. : ill. (some col.), col. maps ; 28 cm.
Scale:
24000