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Geology and origin of epigenetic lode gold deposits, Tintina Gold Province, Alaska and Yukon: Chapter A in Recent U.S. Geological Survey studies in the Tintina Gold Province, Alaska, United States, and Yukon, Canada--results of a 5-year project

Scientific Investigations Report 2007-5289-A

This report is Chapter A in Recent U.S. Geological Survey studies in the Tintina Gold Province, Alaska, United States, and Yukon, Canada--results of a 5-year project. For more information, see: Scientific Investigation Report 2007-5289.
By:
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Edited by:
Larry P. Gough and Warren C. Day

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Abstract

More than 50 million ounces of lode gold resources have been defined in the previous 15 years throughout accreted terranes of interior Alaska and in adjacent continental margin rocks of Yukon. The major deposits in this so-called Tintina Gold Province formed around 105 to 90 million years ago in east-central Alaska and Yukon, and around 70 million years ago in southwestern Alaska, late in the deformational history of their host rocks. All gold deposits studied to date formed from CO2 -rich and 18O-rich crustal fluids, most commonly of low salinity. The older group of ores includes the low-grade intrusion-related gold systems at Fort Knox near Fairbanks and those in Yukon, with fluids exsolved from fractionating melts at depths of 3 to 9 kilometers and forming a zoned sequence of auriferous mineralization styles extending outward to the surrounding metasedimentary country rocks. The causative plutons are products of potassic mafic magmas generated in the subcontinental lithospheric mantle that interacted with overlying lower to middle crust to generate the more felsic ore-related intrusions. In addition, the older ores include spatially associated, high-grade, shear-zonerelated orogenic gold deposits formed at the same depths from upward-migrating metamorphic fluids; the Pogo deposit is a relatively deep-seated example of such. The younger gold ores, restricted to southwestern Alaska, formed in unmetamorphosed sedimentary rocks of the Kuskokwim basin within 1 to 2 kilometers of the surface. Most of these deposits formed via fluid exsolution from shallowly emplaced, highly evolved igneous complexes generated mainly as mantle melts. However, the giant Donlin Creek orogenic gold deposit is a product of either metamorphic devolatilization deep in the basin or of a gold-bearing fluid released from a flysch-melt igneous body.

Geospatial Extents

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Report
Publication Subtype:
USGS Numbered Series
Title:
Geology and origin of epigenetic lode gold deposits, Tintina Gold Province, Alaska and Yukon: Chapter A in Recent U.S. Geological Survey studies in the Tintina Gold Province, Alaska, United States, and Yukon, Canada--results of a 5-year project
Series title:
Scientific Investigations Report
Series number:
2007-5289
Chapter:
A
Year Published:
2007
Language:
English
Publisher:
U.S. Geological Survey
Publisher location:
Reston, VA
Contributing office(s):
Eastern Mineral Resources Science Center
Description:
iii, 18 p.
Larger Work Type:
Report
Larger Work Subtype:
USGS Numbered Series
Larger Work Title:
Recent U.S. Geological Survey studies in the Tintina Gold Province, Alaska, United States, and Yukon, Canada--results of a 5-year project (Scientific Investigations Report 2007-5289)
Country:
Canada;United States
State:
Alaska;Yukon
Other Geospatial:
Tintina Gold Province