thumbnail

A study of radioactivity in modern stream gravels and its possible application as a prospecting method

Trace Elements Memorandum 629

This report concerns work done on behalf of the Division of Raw Materials of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission
By:

Links

Abstract

Traverses along some streams of the Colorado Plateau in areas known to contain minable uranium deposits show that anomalous radiation in the stream gravels can be detected with a suitable counter downstream from the deposits. The amount of radiation is influenced by the size of the uranium deposit, the size of the drainage area of the stream, the grain size of the sediments, and the lithology of the rocks over which the stream flows. The spacing of the stations where readings are taken is controlled by the size of the stream, and special readings are also taken directly downstream from important tributaries. An anomaly is empirically defined as a 10 percent rise over background. Radioactive material from large uranium deposits has been detected as much as 1 mile downstream. Radioactive material from smaller deposits is detachable over shorter distances. The method is slow but appears to be a useful prospecting tool under restricted conditions.

Geospatial Extents

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Report
Publication Subtype:
USGS Numbered Series
Title:
A study of radioactivity in modern stream gravels and its possible application as a prospecting method
Series title:
Trace Elements Memorandum
Series number:
629
Year Published:
1955
Language:
English
Publisher:
U.S. Geological Survey
Description:
37 p.
Number of Pages:
39
Country:
United States
State:
Colorado;Utah
County:
Emery County;Grand County;San Juan County
City:
Grand Junction
Other Geospatial:
Corral Canyon;Seven Mile Area;Colorado River;Colorado Plateau;Temple Mountain Area;San Rafael District;White Canyon Area
Additional Online Files(Y/N):
Y