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Biodegradation potential of chlorinated solvents in ground water at the Naval Surface Warfare Center, Louisville, Kentucky, July 1999 to February 2000

Water-Resources Investigations Report 2001-4242

Prepared in cooperation with the Southern Division Naval Facilities Engineering Command
By:
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Abstract

The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of the Navy, Southern Division Naval Facilities Engineering Command, investigated the potential for biodegradation of chlorinated solvents in ground water at the Naval Surface Warfare Center (also known as the Naval Ordnance Station, or the station), Louisville, Kentucky. The subsurface down to at least 100 feet at the station is characterized, from shallowest to deepest, by overburden deposits, a shale layer, and limestone. In general, all of the strata are poorly permeable. The permeable zones of the overburden and the limestone make up the overburden aquifer and the bedrock aquifer, respectively. Observed concentrations of redox-sensitive solutes suggest that the predominant anaerobic terminal electron accepting process in the overburden aquifer can shift between iron reduction and sulfate reduction, possibly as a result of rainfall-induced oxidation events. Daughter-product concentrations and laboratory experiments indicate that a variety of mechanisms, including reductive dechlorination and cometabolic oxidation, appear to be actively

Study Area

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Report
Publication Subtype:
USGS Numbered Series
Title:
Biodegradation potential of chlorinated solvents in ground water at the Naval Surface Warfare Center, Louisville, Kentucky, July 1999 to February 2000
Series title:
Water-Resources Investigations Report
Series number:
2001-4242
Year Published:
2001
Language:
English
Publisher:
U.S. Geological Survey
Publisher location:
Columbia, SC
Description:
iv, 22 p.
Country:
United States
State:
Kentucky
Additional Online Files(Y/N):
N