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Technique for Estimating the Magnitude and Frequency of Floods in Texas

Water-Resources Investigations Report 77-110

Prepared in cooperation with the State Department of Highways and Public Transportation and the Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration
By:
and

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Abstract

Drainage area, slope, and mean annual precipitation were the only factors that were statistically significant at the 95-percent confidence level when the characteristics of the drainage basins were used as independent variables in a multiple-regression flood-frequency analysis of natural, unregulated streams in Texas. The State was divided into six regions on the basis of the distribution of the residuals from a single statewide regression of the 10-year flood. Equations were developed for predicting the magnitude of floods with recurrence intervals of 2, 5, 10, 25, 50, and 100 years in each of the six regions. These equations are applicable to unregulated rural streams with drainage basins ranging in area from 0.3 square mile to about 5,000 square miles in some regions. Regression equations were not developed for several areas, particularly in south Texas, because of the lack of definition of the flood-frequency characteristics. (Woodard-USGS)

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Report
Publication Subtype:
USGS Numbered Series
Title:
Technique for Estimating the Magnitude and Frequency of Floods in Texas
Series title:
Water-Resources Investigations Report
Series number:
77-110
Edition:
-
Year Published:
1977
Language:
ENGLISH
Publisher:
Geological Survey (U.S.)
Contributing office(s):
U.S. Geological Survey
Description:
iii, 22 p.