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Geohydrology of part of the Round Valley Indian Reservation, Mendocino County, California

Water-Resources Investigations Report 77-22

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Abstract

The Round Valley Indian Reservation in northern California obtains most of its water from the ground-water reservoir. The ground-water reservoir is made up of continental deposits, alluvium, and stream-channel deposits ranging in age from Pliocene to Holocene. Most of the water is pumped from the alluvium. Most ground water (about 20,000 acre-feet or 25 cubic hectometers per year) is derived from stream seepage. Natural discharge (discharge to streams, evapotranspiration, and underflow) has averaged about 21,000 acre-feet per year. Pumping and flow from artesian wells has averaged about 2,750 acre-feet per year. Ground water occurs in both confined and unconfined aquifers. The ground-water reservoir is full, and about 230,000 acre-feet of water is stored in the depth interval 10-200 feet. The water is chemically and biologically suitable for domestic or irrigation use, although hardness is high for domestic use and, locally, dissolved iron is a problem. There is potential for developing additional ground-water supplies. (Woodard-USGS)

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Report
Publication Subtype:
USGS Numbered Series
Title:
Geohydrology of part of the Round Valley Indian Reservation, Mendocino County, California
Series title:
Water-Resources Investigations Report
Series number:
77-22
Edition:
-
Year Published:
1977
Language:
ENGLISH
Publisher:
U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division,
Description:
vi, 40 p. :ill., map ;27 cm.