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Tree rings as indicators of hydrologic change in the Great Dismal Swamp, Virginia and North Carolina

Water-Resources Investigations Report 78-136

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Abstract

Analysis of tree rings of large, canopy loblolly pines (Pinus taeda L.) growing near a drainage ditch in the Great Dismal Swamp have indicated that the tree rings are datable and hydrologically (climatically) sensitive. Climatic and prior growth factors in regression explained 87 and 71 percent of the variance of the preditching and postditching earlywood widths, respectively, and 82 and 70 percent of the latewood widths for the same time periods. Early summer precipitation was significantly, and positively correlated with preditching latewood growth. When preditching and postditching records were merged into a single record, regression analysis explained less growth variation than when the two time periods were considered individually, implying a change in growth response following ditching. Prior to ditching, growth was most limited by dry summers which followed dry summers. After ditching, growth was less strongly linked with precipitation and more strongly linked with temperature. Regression results are compatible with the contention that growing season water levels in the proximity of the collection site have been lower since ditching. (Kosco-USGS)

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Report
Publication Subtype:
USGS Numbered Series
Title:
Tree rings as indicators of hydrologic change in the Great Dismal Swamp, Virginia and North Carolina
Series title:
Water-Resources Investigations Report
Series number:
78-136
Edition:
-
Year Published:
1979
Language:
ENGLISH
Publisher:
U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division,
Description:
v, 26 p. :ill. ;27 cm.