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Estimating highest ground-water levels for construction and land use planning : a Cape Cod, Massachusetts, example

Water-Resources Investigations Report 83-4112

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Abstract

High ground water is a major cause of septic-system failures, wet basements, and other problems for suburban and rural residents. A technique for estimating the level to which groundwater can rise as a consequence of weather and seasonal factors has been developed. Water-level records from about 160 sites were used to make four maps of ranges of annual water-level change: 0-2 feet, 2-3 feet, 3-4 feet, 4-5 feet, and 5-6 feet. Nine observation wells with 16 or more years of record were used to index water-level fluctuations throughout Cape Cod. To estimate high water levels, measurements of the current depth to water at test sites are cross referenced with current depth to water in the index wells. The technique assumes good correlation between water-level fluctuations at septic-system sites and the index wells. Eighty-seven percent of the correlation coefficients determined from correlating water-level fluctuations from 146 sites with water-level fluctuations in the index wells were greater than 0.8. (USGS)

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Report
Publication Subtype:
USGS Numbered Series
Title:
Estimating highest ground-water levels for construction and land use planning : a Cape Cod, Massachusetts, example
Series title:
Water-Resources Investigations Report
Series number:
83-4112
Edition:
-
Year Published:
1983
Language:
ENGLISH
Publisher:
U.S. Geological Survey,
Description:
v, 23 p. :ill., maps (some col.) ;28 cm.