The Southern Hills regional aquifer system of southeastern Louisiana and southwestern Mississippi

Water-Resources Investigations Report 83-4189




The Southern Hills regional aquifer system, named in a petition to the Environmental Protection Agency for designation as a sole or principal source of drinking water, is the primary source of public and domestic supplies in the northern 10 parishes of southeastern Louisiana. The gulfward dipping and thickening, complexly interbedded aquifer system extends from the northern limit of the recharge area near Vicksburg, Mississippi, as far as the Baton Rouge area in southeastern Louisiana. As many as 13 interdependent aquifer units compose the system in the southern part of the area and are known to coalesce or pinch out northward (updip) into fewer units. Aquifer water is almost exclusively a soft, sodium bicarbonate type with an average dissolved-solids concentration of about 220 milligrams per liter in southeastern Louisiana. Although several streams are available as alternatives for supply, they have not been accepted by local officials because of the additional water treatment that would be necessary and the extensive distribution system needed to deliver water to areas not near a source stream. Groundwater use in 1980 for public and domestic supply averaged 121 Mgal/d (million gallons per day), serving 744,000 people in southeastern Louisiana. In southwestern Mississippi, where the aquifer system is also the primary source for public and domestic supply, water use for these categories in 1980 totaled 25 Mgal/d, serving about 273,000 people. (USGS)

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The Southern Hills regional aquifer system of southeastern Louisiana and southwestern Mississippi
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Water-Resources Investigations Report
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U.S. Geological Survey,
iv, 43 p. :ill., maps ;28 cm.