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Floods of March 1982, Indiana, Michigan, and Ohio

Water-Resources Investigations Report 83-4201

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Abstract

Rapid melting of a snowpack containing 2 to 6 inches of water equivalent coinciding with moderate rainfall caused flooding in March 1982 across northern Indiana, southern Michigan, and northwestern Ohio. Millions of dollars in property damage and the loss of four lives resulted from the flooding. Peak discharges at several gaging stations in each of the following river basins have recurrence intervals of 50 to greater than 100 years: Wabash, St. Joseph, River Raisin, Maumee, and Kankakee. Flooding in the Wabash River basin was confined to major tributaries draining from the north. The St. Joseph River experienced flooding having a recurrence interval of about 50 years. Peak discharges having recurrence intervals of 50 to greater than 100 years were recorded on the River Raisin. Flooding on most large streams in the Maumee River basin was the worst since 1913. The Kankakee River and its major tributary, Yellow River, recorded peak discharges having recurrence intervals greater than 100 years. Hydrologic data have been tabulated for 83 gaging stations and partial-record sites. Maps are presented to emphasize the severity and untimely sequence of meteorological conditions that provided the potential and triggered the floods. Hydrographs are shown for 32 gaging stations. (USGS)

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Report
Publication Subtype:
USGS Numbered Series
Title:
Floods of March 1982, Indiana, Michigan, and Ohio
Series title:
Water-Resources Investigations Report
Series number:
83-4201
Edition:
-
Year Published:
1984
Language:
ENGLISH
Publisher:
U.S. Geological Survey,
Description:
vi, 40 p. :ill., maps ;28 cm.