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Subsurface storage of freshwater in south Florida; a prospectus

Water-Resources Investigations Report 83-4214

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Abstract

A method of increasing storage capacity for freshwater in south Florida is to use brackish artesian aquifers as reservoirs. In this way, water deficiencies occurring during the annual dry season can be offset by surplus water obtained during the wet season and injected underground. Most of south Florida is underlain by several deep, confined, carbonate waterbearing zones which might be suitable for freshwater storage. These zones are in the Avon Park, Ocala, Suwannee, Tampa, and Hawthorn Formations. Experimental freshwater injection systems have been operated at five locations with promising, but not fully definitive, results. A determination of the feasibility of freshwater injection at a selected site begins with an assessment of the local geologic suitability. Verification of feasibility, however, requires injection and recovery tests to be performed at the site. Recovery efficiency, a measure of the success of the operation, is the amount of potable water, expressed as a percentage of the volume injected, which can be recovered before its salinity, or the concentration of other chemical constituents present in the native aquifer water, increases to the point that the recovered water is no longer useable. (USGS)

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Report
Publication Subtype:
USGS Numbered Series
Title:
Subsurface storage of freshwater in south Florida; a prospectus
Series title:
Water-Resources Investigations Report
Series number:
83-4214
Edition:
-
Year Published:
1983
Language:
ENGLISH
Publisher:
U.S. Geological Survey,
Description:
iv, 73 p. :ill., maps ;28 cm.