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Geohydrology and chemical quality of water in Middle and Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous rocks, western Kansas

Water-Resources Investigations Report 84-4045

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Abstract

Fresh and saline water occur in Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous rocks in western Kansas. The maximum thickness of the Jurassic aquifer is about 50 feet. During 1981, water levels ranged from 255 to 1,160 feet below land surface; the static heads ranged from about 2,400 to 3,100 feet above sea level and the hydraulic gradient ranged from 16 feet per mile toward the northeast to 40 feet per mile toward the north. The water is moderately saline, very hard, a sodium sulfate or sodium chloride type, and unsuitable for drinking and irrigation. The maximum thickness of the Cheyenne aquifer is about 190 feet. During 1981, water levels ranged from 267 to 375 feet below land surface; the static heads varied from less than 2,300 to more than 3,200 feet above sea level; and the hydraulic gradient was 8 feet per mile toward the east. The water is fresh to moderately saline, soft to very hard, a sodium sulfate or sodium , bicarbonate type, and suitable to unsuitable for drinking and irrigation. The maximum thickness of the Dakota aquifer is about 150 feet. During 1982, water levels ranged from 24 to 604 feet below land surface; the static heads ranged from about 2,100 to 3,200 feet above sea level; and the hydraulic gradient was 11 feet per mile toward the east and northeast. The water is fresh to slightly saline, soft to very hard, and suitable to unsuitable for drinking and irrigation. (USGS)

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Report
Publication Subtype:
USGS Numbered Series
Title:
Geohydrology and chemical quality of water in Middle and Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous rocks, western Kansas
Series title:
Water-Resources Investigations Report
Series number:
84-4045
Edition:
-
Year Published:
1984
Language:
ENGLISH
Publisher:
U.S. Geological Survey,
Description:
x, 54 p. :ill., maps ;28 cm.