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Geohydrology and potential for artificial recharge in the western part of the US Marine Corps Base, Twentynine Palms, California, 1982-83

Water-Resources Investigations Report 84-4119

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Abstract

A gravity survey indicates that sedimentary deposits in the Deadman Lake area of the U.S. Marine Corps Base at Twentynine Palms, California, are as much as 10,500 ft thick. These deposits fill an ancient valley in the bedrock complex. Over the past 30 years in Surprise Spring subbasin, water levels have changed little in the Ames Dry Lake area and have declined an average of about 85 ft in three Marine Corps Base supply wells near Surprise Spring. Water levels in the same time span in Deadman subbasin have remained virtually unchanged. Water quality in the base supply wells has remained virtually unchanged since the wells were drilled in 1952-53 and 1978. Original storage of groundwater suitable for domestic use in the top 200 ft of saturated sediments in Surprise Spring subbasin is estimated at 810,000 acre-feet. About 60,000 acre-feet of this has been removed, mostly for use at the base, which leaves about 750,000 acre-feet of recoverable water of good quality. For planning purposes, a conservative figure is 300,000 acre-feet for storage in the Deadman subbasin, which contains water having fluoride concentrations greater than the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 's standards for drinking water. Three sites near the present well field seem favorable for recharging the groundwater system in the Surprise Spring basin. (USGS)

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Report
Publication Subtype:
USGS Numbered Series
Title:
Geohydrology and potential for artificial recharge in the western part of the US Marine Corps Base, Twentynine Palms, California, 1982-83
Series title:
Water-Resources Investigations Report
Series number:
84-4119
Edition:
-
Year Published:
1986
Language:
ENGLISH
Publisher:
U.S.Geological Survey,
Description:
iv, 18 p. :ill., maps ;28 cm.