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Sources of water and nitrogen to the Widefield Aquifer, southwestern El Paso County, Colorado

Water-Resources Investigations Report 85-4162

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Abstract

The Widefield aquifer near Colorado Springs, Colorado, is recharged primarily by Fountain Creek and, to a lesser extent, by infiltration and percolation of water from the land surface and from groundwater inflow. During the past 20 to 30 years, concentrations of nitrate (as nitrogen) in the Widefield aquifer have increased from 0.5 to 3.0 milligrams/L to nearly 10 milligrams/L, and occasionally exceed the drinking-water standard of 10 milligrams/L as nitrogen. During the summer of 1982, the concentrations of nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen in water in the aquifer ranged from 3.2 to 15 milligrams/L with a mean concentration of 6.9 milligrams/L. In general, the nitrite-plus-nitrate concentrations are greatest near the north end of the aquifer, probably resulting from effluent from Colorado Springs Sewage Treatment Plant being discharged to Fountain Creek. During 1982, 93% of the total estimated 160 tons of nitrogen available to enter the Widefield aquifer was from the Colorado Springs Sewage Treatment Plant. However, a significant proportion of this nitrogen may have been lost through denitrification. (USGS)

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Report
Publication Subtype:
USGS Numbered Series
Title:
Sources of water and nitrogen to the Widefield Aquifer, southwestern El Paso County, Colorado
Series title:
Water-Resources Investigations Report
Series number:
85-4162
Edition:
-
Year Published:
1985
Language:
ENGLISH
Publisher:
U.S. Geological Survey,
Description:
v, 81 p. :ill., maps ;28 cm.