thumbnail

Soil, water, and streambed quality at a demolished asphalt plant, Fort Bragg, North Carolina, 1992-94

Water-Resources Investigations Report 95-4215

By:

Links

Abstract

A number of potentially hazardous chemicals were used at an asphalt plant on the Fort Bragg U.S. Army Reservation near Fayetteville, North Carolina. This plant was demolished in the late 1960's. Samples collected from soil, ground water, surface water, and streambed sediment were tested for the presence of contaminants. The sediment immediately underlying the demolished asphalt plant site consists mainly of sands, silts, and clayey sands with interbedded clay occurring at various depths. About 12 inches of rainfall per year infiltrate the unconfined surficial aquifer. The water table in this area is about 233 to 243 feet above sea level. Local ground water moves laterally, mainly towards the north- to-northwest at a rate of about 35 feet per year. where it discharges to Tank Creek, Little River, or one of their tributaries. A series of confining clays separate the surficial aquifer from the underlying upper Cape Fear aquifer. These clays help retard vertical migration of constituents dissolved in ground water. The saprolite-bedrock aquifer lies below the upper Cape Fear aquifer. In general ground water in the seven monitoring wells screened in the upper and lower part of the surficial aquifer did not contain detectable concentrations of chemicals related to past asphalt-plant activities. A small number of chemicals that were assumed to be unrelated to the asphalt plant were present in some of the study area monitoring wells. Ground water in four wells contained concentrations of organochlorine pesticides. Of these pesticides, concentrations of gamma-benzene hexachloride (lindane) (maximum of 0.76 micrograms per liter) exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency maximum contaminant level of 0.2 micrograms per liter in two wells. In addition, one well contained a trichloroethane concentration (7.7 micrograms per liter) that is assumed to be unrelated to demolished asphalt-plant operations, but exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency maximum contaminant level of 5.0 micrograms per liter. One well contained a fluoride concentration of 5.2 milligrams per liter that exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency maximum contaminant level of 4.0 milligrams per liter. Total and dissolved metals concentrations were generally typical of background levels. Some of the wells contained elevated levels of chloride (maximum of 749 milligrams per liter), specific conductance (maximum of 2,780 microsiemens per centimeter at 25 degrees Celsius), and dissolved solids (maximum of 1,520 milligrams per liter). Twelve of twenty-two soil samples that were collected at various depths at monitoring-well locations did not contain volatile organic compounds or polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. The remaining ten soil samples contained very low concentrations of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons and (or) analytical laboratory-related volatile organic compounds. The maximum concentrations were for fluoranthene and pyrene, at 780 and 750 micrograms per kilogram, respectively. In general, the polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations were in sediment near the land surface. Streambed sediment from an unnamed, eastern tributary to Tank Creek in the eastern part of the site contained a small number of organochlorine pesticide compounds (a maximum of 1,400 milligrams per kilogram of 4,4'-DDD) and total petroleum hydrocarbons (113 milligrams per kilogram). Concentrations of metals and other inorganic constituents were generally typical of background concentrations. Surface water in this tributary did not contain elevated concentrations of anthropogenic chemicals.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Report
Publication Subtype:
USGS Numbered Series
Title:
Soil, water, and streambed quality at a demolished asphalt plant, Fort Bragg, North Carolina, 1992-94
Series title:
Water-Resources Investigations Report
Series number:
95-4215
Edition:
-
Year Published:
1996
Language:
ENGLISH
Publisher:
U.S. Geological Survey ; Earth Science Information Center, Open-File Reports Section [distributor],
Description:
viii, 92 p. :ill., maps ;28 cm.