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Streamflow from the United States into the Atlantic Ocean during 1931-1960

Water Supply Paper 1899-I

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Abstract

Streamflow from the United States into the Atlantic Ocean, between the international stream St. Croix River, inclusive, and Cape Sable, Fla., averaged about 355,000 cfs (cubic feet per second) during the 30-year period 1931-60, or roughly 20 percent of the water that, on the average flows out of the conterminous United States. The area drained by streams flowing into the Atlantic Ocean is about 288,000 square miles, including the Canadian part of the St. Croix and Connecticut River basins, or a little less than 10 percent of the area of the conterminous United States. Hence, the average streamflow into the Atlantic Ocean, in terms of cubic feet per second per square mile, is about twice the national average of the flow that leaves the conterminous United States. Flow from about three-fourths of the area draining into the Atlantic Ocean is gaged at streamflow measuring stations of the U.S. Geological Survey. The remaining one-fourth of the drainage area consists mostly of low-lying coastal areas from which the flow was estimated, largely on the basis of nearby gaging stations. Streamflow, in terms of cubic feet per second per square mile, decreases rather progressively from north to south. It averages nearly 2 cfs along the Maine coast, about 1 cfs along the North Carolina coast, and about 0.9 cfs along the Florida coast.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Report
Publication Subtype:
USGS Numbered Series
Title:
Streamflow from the United States into the Atlantic Ocean during 1931-1960
Series title:
Water Supply Paper
Series number:
1899
Chapter:
I
Edition:
-
Year Published:
1970
Language:
ENGLISH
Publisher:
United States Government Printing Office,
Description:
iv, 36p. :ill. ;23 cm.