thumbnail

Birds at a Southern California beach: seasonality, habitat use and disturbance by human activity

Biodiversity and Conservation

By:
DOI:10.1023/A:1013195504810

Links

Abstract

Use of a Santa Barbara beach by people and birds varied in both time and space. There were 100 birds, 18 people and 2 dogs per kilometer. Bird density varied primarily with the season and tide while human activity varied most between weekend and weekday. Bird distributions along the beach were determined mainly by habitat type (particularly a lagoon and exposed rocky intertidal areas) For crows and western gulls, there was some evidence that access to urban refuse increased abundance. Interactions between birds and people often caused birds to move or fly away, particularly when people were within 20 m. During a short observation period, 10% of humans and 39% of dogs disturbed birds. More than 70% of birds flew when disturbed. Bird species varied in the frequency that they were disturbed, partially because a few bird species foraged on the upper beach where contact with people was less frequent. Most disturbances occurred low on the beach. Although disturbances caused birds to move away from humans, most displacement was short enough that variation in human activity did not alter large-scale patterns of beach use by the birds. Birds were less reactive to humans (but not dogs) when beach activity was low.

Additional publication details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Birds at a Southern California beach: seasonality, habitat use and disturbance by human activity
Series title:
Biodiversity and Conservation
DOI:
10.1023/A:1013195504810
Volume:
10
Issue:
11
Year Published:
2001
Language:
English
Publisher:
Springer
Contributing office(s):
Western Ecological Research Center
Description:
14 p.
First page:
1949
Last page:
1962