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Habitat use and foraging behavior of Townsend's big-eared bat (Corynorhinus townsendii) in coastal California

Journal of Mammalogy

By:
and
DOI:10.1644/1545-1542(2002)083<0167:HUAFBO>2.0.CO;2

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Abstract

Radiotracking studies of Townsend's big-eared bat (Corynorhinus townsendii) were conducted in grazed grassland and coastal forest (California bay, Douglas-fir, and redwood) at Point Reyes National Seashore in coastal central California. Radiotagged bats were used to determine the foraging patterns of both female and male bats and to locate alternate roost sites. The animals showed considerable loyalty to their primary roost sites even though the study was conducted after the nursery period had ended, when the bats would normally be dispersing for the season. Foraging patterns differed between male and female bats, with females traveling greater distances than males. Males consistently stayed close to the maternity colony both during day and night. Both sexes flew in the immediate vicinity of vegetation, both when foraging and when traveling from the roost to foraging areas. Foraging activity was concentrated primarily along the edges of riparian vegetation.

Additional publication details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Habitat use and foraging behavior of Townsend's big-eared bat (Corynorhinus townsendii) in coastal California
Series title:
Journal of Mammalogy
DOI:
10.1644/1545-1542(2002)083<0167:HUAFBO>2.0.CO;2
Volume:
83
Issue:
1
Year Published:
2002
Language:
English
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Contributing office(s):
Western Ecological Research Center
Description:
11 p.
First page:
167
Last page:
177