thumbnail

Amphibians and disease: Implications for conservation in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem

Yellowstone Science

By:

Links

Abstract

The decline of amphibian populations is a world-wide phenomenon that has received increasing attention since about 1990. In 2004, the World Conservation Union’s global amphibian assessment concluded that 48% of the world’s 5,743 described amphibian species were in decline, with 32% considered threatened (Stuart et al. 2004). Amphibian declines are a significant issue in the western United States, where all native species of frogs in the genus Rana and many toads in the genus Bufo are at risk, particularly those that inhabit mountainous areas (Corn 2003a,b; Bradford 2005).

Study Area

Additional publication details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Amphibians and disease: Implications for conservation in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem
Series title:
Yellowstone Science
Volume:
15
Issue:
2
Year Published:
2007
Language:
English
Publisher:
Yellowstone Association for Natural Science, History & Education
Contributing office(s):
Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center
Description:
6 p.
First page:
11
Last page:
16
Country:
United States
State:
Wyoming
Other Geospatial:
Yellowstone National Park
Online Only (Y/N):
Y
Additional Online Files (Y/N):
N