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Toxicological significance of soil ingestion by wild and domestic animals

By:
and
Edited by:
David J. Hoffman, Barnett A. Rattner, G. Allen Burton Jr., and John Cairns Jr.
https://doi.org/10.1201/9781420032505.ch6

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Abstract

Most wild and domestic animals ingest some soil or sediment, and some species may routinely, or under special circumstances, ingest considerable amounts. Ingested soil supplies nutrients, exposes animals to parasites and pathogens, and may play a role in developing immune systems.1 Soil ingestion is also sometimes the principal route of exposure to various environmental contaminants.2-7 Ingestion of soil and earthy material is defined as geophagy and may be either intentional or unintentional, occurring as an animal eats or grooms.

Additional publication details

Publication type:
Book chapter
Publication Subtype:
Book Chapter
Title:
Toxicological significance of soil ingestion by wild and domestic animals
Chapter:
6
ISBN:
1-56670-546-0
DOI:
10.1201/9781420032505.ch6
Edition:
2nd
Year Published:
2003
Language:
English
Publisher:
Lewis Publishers
Publisher location:
Boca Raton, FL
Contributing office(s):
Patuxent Wildlife Research Center
Description:
16 p.
Larger Work Type:
Book
Larger Work Subtype:
Monograph
Larger Work Title:
Handbook of ecotoxicology, second edition
First page:
151
Last page:
166