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Red-winged blackbirds searching beneath pine bark for insects in winter

The Auk

By:
https://doi.org/10.2307/4083067

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Abstract

Most observers usually associate the Red-winged Blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus) with open country such as marshes or upland fields and their wooded or brushy borders. On the wintering grounds in the coniferous belt of the southeastern United States, however, Red-wings spend some of their time feeding in pine forests. In the course of a day's feeding they move back and forth between pine woods and harvested fields of corn, peanuts, and cotton, or weed fields. It is not unusual to see Red-wings feeding in a scattering of pine trees at the edge of a marsh or in some upland area, but I was surprised to find them in dense stands of pine and to observe their method of feeding there.

Additional publication details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Red-winged blackbirds searching beneath pine bark for insects in winter
Series title:
The Auk
DOI:
10.2307/4083067
Volume:
83
Issue:
3
Year Published:
1966
Language:
English
Publisher:
American Ornithological Society
Contributing office(s):
Patuxent Wildlife Research Center
Description:
2 p.
First page:
480
Last page:
481