Population trends of North American shorebirds based on the International Shorebird Survey

Biological Conservation
doi:10.1016/0006-3207(89)90035-9 3756_Howe.pdf
By: , and 

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Abstract

Shorebirds (Charadiiformes) are prime candidates for population decline because of their dependence on wetlands that are being lost at a rapid pace. Thirty-six of the 49 species of shorebirds that breed in North America spend most of the year in Latin America. Because populations of most species breed and winter at remote sites , it may be feasible to monitor their numbers at migration stopovers. In this study, we used statistical trend analysis methods, developed for the North American Breeding Bird Survey, to analyze data on shorebird populations during south-bound migration in the United States. Survey data were collected by volunteers in the International Shorebird Survey (ISS). Methodological concerns over both the ISS and the trend analysis procedures are discussed in detail and biological interpretations of the results are suggested.
Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title Population trends of North American shorebirds based on the International Shorebird Survey
Series title Biological Conservation
Volume 49
Issue 3
Year Published 1989
Language English
Publisher U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Contributing office(s) Patuxent Wildlife Research Center
Description 185-199
Larger Work Type Article
Larger Work Subtype Journal Article
Larger Work Title Biological Conservation
First page 185
Last page 199
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