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[Book review] Ospreys: A natural and unnatural history

The Auk

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https://doi.org/10.2307/4088026

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Abstract

The Osprey (Pandion haliaetus) is now arguably the world's best known bird of prey. The DDT-related Osprey population crash in the northeastern United States resulted in an unparalleled amount of research during the last 20 years. In 1969, when I published my first paper on Ospreys in The Auk, there were only three or four osprey papers of consequence in the United States, plus an important paper on Swedish Ospreys, which hardly compares to the nearly 300 papers (the great majority dealing with Ospreys) cited by Poole in his book. Based on his detailed investigations in eastern North America and the literature from throughout the world, Poole wrote a book with perfect timing. A synthesis of the massive literature on this species was needed, and judging from the bio- logical soundness, completeness, and clear writing style, Poole was the proper person to write the book. Of course it is one aim to prepare a synthesis but, in addition, Poole carefully points out potential biases in data, gaps in information, and needs for further research. The book is both informative, and points out research problems for the next generation of Osprey investigators.

Additional publication details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
[Book review] Ospreys: A natural and unnatural history
Series title:
The Auk
DOI:
10.2307/4088026
Volume:
107
Issue:
4
Year Published:
1990
Language:
English
Publisher:
American Ornithological Society
Contributing office(s):
Patuxent Wildlife Research Center
Description:
2 p.
First page:
808
Last page:
809
Public Comments:
Review of: Ospreys: A Natural and Unnatural History. Alan F. Poole. 1989. Cambridge, United Kingdom, Cambridge University Press. xviii + 246 pp., 92 text figures, 21 text tables, 10 appendices (figures and tables). ISBN 0-521-30623-X