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[Book review] Descriptions of thirty-two new species of birds from the Hawaiian Islands: Part I. Non-Passeriformes [and] Part II. Passeriformes

The Auk

By:
https://doi.org/10.2307/4088185

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Abstract

Perhaps the great appeal of paleontological studies is that they inspire visions of past worlds richer and more interesting than our own. Yet, no matter how fascinating, these fossil creatures and their environments manifest a remoteness measured by more than geological time. But what if bones tell the story of a world that ought to still exist? In their long-awaited, twin monographs describing 32 species of subfossil birds from the Hawaiian Islands and commenting on the remains of perhaps as many as 22 other species, the authors more than double in size the recent endemic avifauna for this subtropical, oceanic archipelago.

Additional publication details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
[Book review] Descriptions of thirty-two new species of birds from the Hawaiian Islands: Part I. Non-Passeriformes [and] Part II. Passeriformes
Series title:
The Auk
DOI:
10.2307/4088185
Volume:
109
Issue:
4
Year Published:
1992
Language:
English
Publisher:
American Ornithological Society
Contributing office(s):
Patuxent Wildlife Research Center
Description:
3 p.
First page:
945
Last page:
947
Public Comments:
Review of Descriptions of Thirty-two New Species of Birds from the Hawaiian Islands: Part I. Non-Passeriformes (Storrs L. Olson and Helen F. James) and Part II. Passeriformes (Helen F. James and Storrs L. Olson). 1991. The American Ornithologists' Union, Washington, D.C., Ornithological Monographs No. 45, 88 pp., 34 text figures and tables. No. 46, 88 pp., 49 text figures and tables. Bound as a set, ISBN 0-935868-54-2