Evidence from tooth surface morphology for a posterior maxillary origin of the proteroglyph gang

Amphibia-Reptilia
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Abstract

Although the front-fanged venom delivery system of the Elapidae is believed to be derived from an aglyphous or opisthoglyphous colubroid ancestor, opinion is divided as to the end of the maxilla on which the proteroglyph fang originated. This study was undertaken to determine whether the evolutionary precursor of the proteroglyph fang was (a) a grooved posterior fang which migrated anteriorly, or (b) an enlarged anterior tooth which secondarily developed a groove for the conduction of venom. The surface morphology of the maxillary teeth of colubrid genera was examined using scanning electron microscopy. Ridges present on the lingual and labial surfaces of anterior maxillary teeth and on the anterior and posterior surfaces of posterior maxillary teeth were identified as morphological markers of potential value in distinguishing the anterior and posterior maxillary teeth of colubrid snakes, and in determining the origin of the proteroglyph fang. Patterns of ridges on the surfaces of elapid fangs examined were found to be consistent with the hypothesis that the evolutionary precursor of the proteroglyph fang was an opisthoglyph fang which migrated anteriorly.
Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title Evidence from tooth surface morphology for a posterior maxillary origin of the proteroglyph gang
Series title Amphibia-Reptilia
Volume 16
Issue 3
Year Published 1995
Language English
Contributing office(s) Patuxent Wildlife Research Center
Description 273-288
Larger Work Type Article
Larger Work Subtype Journal Article
Larger Work Title Amphibia-Reptilia
First page 273
Last page 288
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