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Research, conservation, and collaboration: The role of visiting scientists in developing countries

The Auk

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Abstract

As awareness of environmental problems and the need to protect our natural resources or use them wisely has grown, scientists have become increasingly interested in conservation. Some individuals are involved in conservation-related activities through research or teaching, but most of us participate only as citizens concerned about the world in which we live. Often, we decline to take an active role in conservation issues because we think that "it will take too much time away from our science," or that it is "too much trouble." Both perspectives, I think, are inaccurate. Sometimes investigators fail to participate because they are ignorant of the ways in which scientists (or scientific organizations) interface with conservation - in other words, of how one goes about getting personally involved. Whatever the reason, this lack of involvement is unfortunate, because scientists, and especially "whole organism" biologists (including ornithologists), can make unique contributions to conservation programs, as scientists, without a significant increase in effort or any change in the quality of their work. At the same time, they reap both professional and personal rewards.

Additional publication details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Research, conservation, and collaboration: The role of visiting scientists in developing countries
Series title:
The Auk
Volume:
110
Issue:
2
Year Published:
1993
Language:
English
Publisher:
American Ornithological Society
Contributing office(s):
Patuxent Wildlife Research Center
Description:
4 p.
First page:
414
Last page:
417