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Atlantic Flyway review: Region IV, Piedmont-Coastal Plain, Fall 2004: Robbins Nest, Laurel, MD (390-0765)

North American Bird Bander

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Abstract

The continuing decline in migratory species is depressing. For a 'migration station' to report Northern Cardinal as the species most commonly banded during the autumn months came as a real shock, especially when the cardinal was so far ahead of second-place catbird. I caught twice as many cardinals as all sparrows combined (including juncos), and the total for cardinals came within ten birds of the total for all warblers combined. Warblers comprised only 16.8% of this fall's catch, compared with an average of 21.7% for the previous five years. Hurricanes Bonnie and Frances passed to the east of us and Charles and Ivan to the west, but none was followed by a landfall of migrants.

Last year I reported the sharp drop in Tufted Titmice and Carolina Chickadees locally and the small number of returns from prior years. This year, after no overwintering titmice, numbers have returned to nearly normal, but chickadee numbers are still only half normal. I recaptured cardinals from each year back to 1999, but the only other birds more than two years old were a Carolina Wren and two titmice banded in the autumn of 2000.

Additional publication details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Atlantic Flyway review: Region IV, Piedmont-Coastal Plain, Fall 2004: Robbins Nest, Laurel, MD (390-0765)
Series title:
North American Bird Bander
Volume:
30
Issue:
2
Year Published:
2005
Language:
English
Publisher:
Western, Inland, and Eastern Bird Banding Associations
Contributing office(s):
Patuxent Wildlife Research Center
Description:
1
First page:
87
Last page:
87
Country:
United States
State:
Maryland
County:
Prince George's County
City:
Laurel