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Soil geochemistry of Mother Lode-type gold deposits in the Hodson mining district, central California, U.S.A.

Journal of Geochemical Exploration

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https://doi.org/10.1016/0375-6742(89)90044-7

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Abstract

The Hodson mining district is in the westernmost foothills of the Sierra Nevada in California, about 17 km west of the town of Angels Camp. This district is part of the West Gold Belt, which lies about 12-16 km west of, and generally parallel to, the better known Mother Lode Gold Belt in central California. The district produced several million dollars worth of Au between about 1890 and 1940.

The geologic setting and mineral deposits in the West Gold Belt are generally similar to those in the Mother Lode Gold Belt. Rocks in the study area are of Jurassic age and consist of a mixture of (1) fine-grained, generally thin-bedded, clastic sedimentary rocks that have been metamorphosed to slates, schists, and phyllites, and (2) massive volcanic flows and welded tuffs that have been metamorphosed to metabasalts and metatuffs. All rocks were intensely faulted and folded during the Late Cretaceous Nevadan orogeny; northnorthwest- and northwest-trending faults dominate. Mining in the area was of low-grade gold-pyrite ores occurring principally in the carbonatized wall rocks adjacent to the major northwest-trending Hodson fault and its splays. Minor amounts of other sulfide minerals (principally chalcopyrite, arsenopyrite, sphalerite, and galena) are locally associated with the Au deposits. 

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Additional publication details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Soil geochemistry of Mother Lode-type gold deposits in the Hodson mining district, central California, U.S.A.
Series title:
Journal of Geochemical Exploration
DOI:
10.1016/0375-6742(89)90044-7
Volume:
32
Issue:
1-3
Year Published:
1989
Language:
English
Publisher:
Elsevier
Description:
3 p.
First page:
53
Last page:
55
Country:
United States
State:
California