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Are traditional methods of determining nest predators and nest fates reliable? An experiment with Wood Thrushes (Hylocichla mustelina) using miniature video cameras

The Auk

By:
and
https://doi.org/10.1642/0004-8038(2002)119[1126:ATMODN]2.0.CO;2

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Abstract

We used miniature infrared video cameras to monitor Wood Thrush (Hylocichla mustelina) nests during 1998–2000. We documented nest predators and examined whether evidence at nests can be used to predict predator identities and nest fates. Fifty-six nests were monitored; 26 failed, with 3 abandoned and 23 depredated. We predicted predator class (avian, mammalian, snake) prior to review of video footage and were incorrect 57% of the time. Birds and mammals were underrepresented whereas snakes were over-represented in our predictions. We documented ≥9 nest-predator species, with the southern flying squirrel (Glaucomys volans) taking the most nests (n = 8). During 2000, we predicted fate (fledge or fail) of 27 nests; 23 were classified correctly. Traditional methods of monitoring nests appear to be effective for classifying success or failure of nests, but ineffective at classifying nest predators.

Additional publication details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Are traditional methods of determining nest predators and nest fates reliable? An experiment with Wood Thrushes (Hylocichla mustelina) using miniature video cameras
Series title:
The Auk
DOI:
10.1642/0004-8038(2002)119[1126:ATMODN]2.0.CO;2
Volume:
119
Issue:
4
Year Published:
2002
Language:
English
Publisher:
American Ornithological Society
Description:
7 p.
First page:
1126
Last page:
1132