Effects of stop-level habitat change on cerulean warbler detections along breeding bird survey routes in the central appalachians

Wilson Journal of Ornithology
By: , and 

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Abstract

- We examined the effects of habitat change on Cerulean Warbler ( Dendroica cerulea) populations at stops along Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) routes in the central Appalachians. We used aerial photographs to compare early (1967/1971), middle (1982/1985), and late (2000/2003) periods and compared 1992 and 2001 National Land Cover Data (NLCD). Mean Cerulean Warbler detections per stop decreased at 68 BBS stops between the early (0.05) and middle (0.01) time periods and their distribution became more restricted (15 vs. 3% of stops), but the amount of deciduous/mixed forest increased. Mean detections at 240 stops decreased from the middle (0.09) to the late (0.06) time periods, but the deciduous/ mixed forest land cover and fragmentation metrics did not change. The amounts of deciduous/mixed forest, core forest area, and edge density in the NLCD analysis decreased from 1992 to 2001, whereas the amount of non-forest land cover increased. The number of Cerulean Warbler detections did not change (1992 = 0.08, 2001 = 0.10; P = 0.11). The lack of concordance between Cerulean Warbler detections and broad habitat features suggests that smaller, microhabitat features may be most important in affecting Cerulean Warbler breeding habitat suitability. Received 10 October 2009. Accepted 31 March 2011.

Additional publication details

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title Effects of stop-level habitat change on cerulean warbler detections along breeding bird survey routes in the central appalachians
Series title Wilson Journal of Ornithology
DOI 10.1676/09-159.1
Volume 123
Issue 4
Year Published 2011
Language English
Publisher Wilson Ornithological Society
Contributing office(s) Coop Res Unit Leetown
Description 10 p.
First page 699
Last page 708
Country United States
Other Geospatial Appalachian Mountains