Survival of the faucet snail after chemical disinfection, pH extremes, and heated water bath treatments

North American Journal of Fisheries Management
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Abstract

The faucet snail Bithynia tentaculata, a nonindigenous aquatic snail from Eurasia, was introduced into Lake Michigan in 1871 and has spread to the mid-Atlantic states, the Great Lakes region, Montana, and most recently, the Mississippi River. The faucet snail serves as intermediate host for several trematodes that have caused large-scale mortality among water birds, primarily in the Great Lakes region and Montana. It is important to limit the spread of the faucet snail; small fisheries equipment can serve as a method of snail distribution. Treatments with chemical disinfection, pH extremes, and heated water baths were tested to determine their effectiveness as a disinfectant for small fisheries equipment. Two treatments eliminated all test snails: (1) a 24-h exposure to Hydrothol 191 at a concentration of at least 20 mg/L and (2) a treatment with 50°C heated water for 1 min or longer. Faucet snails were highly resistant to ethanol, NaCl, formalin, Lysol, potassium permanganate, copper sulfate, Baquacil, Virkon, household bleach, and pH extremes (as low as 1 and as high as 13).

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Additional publication details

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title Survival of the faucet snail after chemical disinfection, pH extremes, and heated water bath treatments
Series title North American Journal of Fisheries Management
DOI 10.1577/M07-211.1
Volume 28
Issue 5
Year Published 2008
Language English
Publisher Wiley
Contributing office(s) National Wildlife Health Center
Description 4 p.
First page 1597
Last page 1600
Country United States
State Wisconsin
Other Geospatial Lake Onalaska
Online Only (Y/N) N
Additional Online Files (Y/N) N