Groupers on the edge: Shelf edge spawning habitat in and around marine reserves of the northeastern Gulf of Mexico

Professional Geographer
By: , and 

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Abstract

The northeastern Gulf of Mexico contains some of the most diverse and productive marine habitat in the United States. Much of this habitat, located on the shelf edge in depths of 50 to 120 m, supports spawning for many economically important species, including groupers. Here, we couple acoustic surveys with georeferenced videography to describe the primary spatial and geologic features of spawning aggregation sites for four economically important species: gag (Mycteroperca microlepis), scamp (M. phenax), red grouper (Epinephelus morio), and red snapper (Lutjanus campechanus), with notes on fish distribution and abundance and spawning activities. We provide information on movement patterns of reef fish determined using acoustic telemetry. Finally, we discuss the possible coupling of geomorphology with hydrographic features to influence the overall productivity of the region and the importance of spatial fishery management in sustaining that productivity. ?? 2011 by Association of American Geographers.

Additional publication details

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title Groupers on the edge: Shelf edge spawning habitat in and around marine reserves of the northeastern Gulf of Mexico
Series title Professional Geographer
DOI 10.1080/00330124.2011.585076
Volume 63
Issue 4
Year Published 2011
Language English
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Contributing office(s) Woods Hole Coastal and Marine Science Center
Description 19 p.
First page 456
Last page 474