Establishing water body areal extent trends in interior Alaska from multi-temporal Landsat data

Remote Sensing Letters
By: , and 

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Abstract

An accurate approach is needed for monitoring, quantifying and understanding surface water variability due to climate change. Separating inter- and intra-annual variances from longer-term shifts in surface water extents due to contemporary climate warming requires repeat measurements spanning a several-decade period. Here, we show that trends developed from multi-date measurements of the extents of more than 15,000 water bodies in central Alaska using Landsat Multispectral Scanner (MSS), Thematic Mapper (TM) and Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) data (1979–2009) were highly influenced by the quantity and timing of the data. Over the 30-year period from 1979 to 2009, the study area had a net decrease (p < 0.05) in the extents of 3.4% of water bodies whereas 86% of water bodies exhibited no significant change. The Landsat-derived dataset provides an opportunity for additional research assessing the drivers of lake and wetland change in this region.

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Additional publication details

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title Establishing water body areal extent trends in interior Alaska from multi-temporal Landsat data
Series title Remote Sensing Letters
DOI 10.1080/01431161.2011.643507
Volume 3
Issue 7
Year Published 2012
Language English
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Publisher location Philadelphia, PA
Contributing office(s) Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center
Description 10 p.
Larger Work Type Article
Larger Work Subtype Journal Article
Larger Work Title Remote Sensing Letters
First page 595
Last page 604
Country United States
State Alaska